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tin-buckets

Tin Buckets – One of the many top Price/Quality Ratio products we offer at UCT (Asia)

When there is a World Cup or Premier Leagues or any other major sports tournaments of the sort, we common people think only of the game and where it’s being held. Less attention is given as to who the actual sponsor of the event is. Large multinational companies however compete with each other and are spending millions to acquire sponsorship rights for these events.

Despite the fact that these large multinational companies spend millions and millions to obtain the official sponsorship rights in order to create global awareness of their brands, some others  are not even sponsors but benefit greatly from such tournaments.

These non-sponsor companies are often immediately associated with the event resulting from the fact that they hold similar sponsorship rights of other events and consumers directly link these brands to a sport or event, known as the halo effect.

Studies showed that Germans mentioned Mercedes as the official sponsors of the EURO 2016, whereas, they are not sponsors of the tournament. They are, in fact, sponsors of the German Football Associations, and are therefore falsely linked by the Germans to be the official sponsors of this tournament.

Another research was conducted on a group of 1,000 UK citizens who were following the Euro Cup, being asked who the sponsors were. The poll showed that people listed more non-sponsors than the actual sponsors.

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uefa-euro-2016

Euro Cup 2016: to sponsor or to Halo sponsor?

When there is a World Cup or Premier Leagues or any other major sports tournaments of the sort, we common people think only of the game and where it’s being held. Less attention is given as to who the actual sponsor of the event is. Large multinational companies however compete with each other and are spending millions to acquire sponsorship rights for these events.

Despite the fact that these large multinational companies spend millions and millions to obtain the official sponsorship rights in order to create global awareness of their brands, some others  are not even sponsors but benefit greatly from such tournaments.

These non-sponsor companies are often immediately associated with the event resulting from the fact that they hold similar sponsorship rights of other events and consumers directly link these brands to a sport or event, known as the halo effect.
Studies showed that Germans mentioned Mercedes as the official sponsors of the EURO 2016, whereas, they are not sponsors of the tournament. They are, in fact, sponsors of the German Football Associations, and are therefore falsely linked by the Germans to be the official sponsors of this tournament.

Another research was conducted on a group of 1,000 UK citizens who were following the Euro Cup, being asked who the sponsors were. The poll showed that people listed more non-sponsors than the actual sponsors.

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why-crafted-beer

Why Craft Beers are taking the world over

Recent studies have shown that the demands for craft beers are have been increasing daily, for the last eight years, and the trend is going to continue rising in the years to come.

Reports showed that there was a slight 0.2% drop in volume for the global beer market in 2015, but craft beer volumes increased up to 13% in the same year.

And whilst these small breweries go up against larger breweries like MillerCoors or ABI, they achieved up to 12% market share of the total beer market as of 2015. There is a clear sign that the growth will continue and could take up to 20% of the total beer market by the year 2020, says Bart Watson, chief economist of Brewers Association.

The motive which causes such growth is the demand for fuller flavored craft beer due to the variety of styles that craft brewers have on offer and the consumers’ willingness to spend more money on these beers. Large breweries focus on volume but small breweries score bigger on price.

With higher sales and increasing market share each year, comes the merger and acquisition activities where larger breweries scoop up tiny brewers. This causes concerns for some consumers who are afraid their local craft beer would be taken over, but that will not put a halt to the increase sales of craft beer.

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